4 Things To Consider When Choosing Containers For Succulents

After planning which succulents to plant in your garden, you will have to decide the size, material, and drainage capacity of the containers or pots. It is important to consider the quality of your containers for succulents before beginning to plant them because the healthy growth of the plants will also depend on the right material used for the container.

1. The Size of the Container for Succulents

Keep in mind that it is easier to grow plants in large containers because it allows their roots to grow without any hindrance. A large container holds more soil, which stays moist longer and does not dry out easily as the soil in small pots. The rapid temperature outside can cause fluctuations in the moisture content of the soil, so more soil and more moisture mean a better chance for these plants to thrive.

Small hanging baskets are prone to drying out quickly, especially during hot and humid summer days. Though succulent plants generally like the idea of being dried out and not being watered regularly, this routine might change if the soil will use its moisture.

It is also important to consider what plant to grow in each container. You have to consider the size of the plants’ root systems, though succulents don’t grow that much in terms of root size. If you are going into mixed planting and plans to combine different succulent variants, you may have to buy a large container to accommodate all the roots that would take place.

2. The Drainage Capability of the Container

Whatever container you choose, drainage holes are important. Without drainage holes, water will pool and plants may die because of “drowning.” The holes don’t need to be large, though they have to be sizeable enough to squeeze the remaining water out of the roots. If you managed to buy a container with no holes in them, you have to drill ones yourself. Or, you can use this as a cachepot, which is functional for managing large plants and heavy pots. Simply grow your plants in an ordinary nursery pot that fits inside a decorative cachepot. You can then move them separately when the weather requires.

3. The Material of the Container

Each material used to make containers has its own benefits and drawbacks. Terracotta containers are attractive, but they easily break. Concrete containers last long and they come in a range of sizes and styles, but they are heavy and could not be moved from one area to another. Fiberglass, plastic, and planters are lightweight, inexpensive, and are available in different sizes and styles. However, they can become brittle over time and may even break and cause your plants to die. Wood is natural-looking and they are attractive and protects roots from the temperature swings. But you need to be careful in choosing the type of wood. Don’t use creosote, which is toxic to plants.

4. The Preparation for the Container

When the soil is out inside the containers, they will naturally become heavy and you have to decide strategically where to place them in your garden. Metal and plastic containers are lighter compared to wood and terracotta containers, so you can hang metal and plastic containers even with the soil and plant in them. But remember that metal containers can get very hot, too, so make sure they are not directly under the sun. These are just some of the considerations you need to make when preparing the container for your garden.

3 Key Benefits of Container Gardens For Succulents

Pots, old fishbowls, metal tubs, half barrels, and an old crate overflowing with succulents, flowers, and plants add appeal to any garden, but they have practical purposes, too. Aside from making your gardens look incredibly gorgeous, container gardens are also flexible and versatile when it comes to the maintenance. Container gardening is ideal for people with small patches of lands to turn into a garden. They can also be employed by people who have no space to start even a tiny garden, which makes this strategy workable for those living in apartment buildings and condominiums.

In addition to growing flowers, those who can only plant on a little space in their balcony or their driveway can grow a wide variety of vegetable crops in containers. The most important spices and herbs—basil, thyme, chives, rosemary, spring onion, and even chili—in our pantry can grow in pots and containers. In fact, you can put these potted herbs on your windowsill by the kitchen and just nip their buds when you need them for cooking. How much fresher can that be, right?

1. Adds Versatility to Gardens

We are so used to seeing gardens with roses or tulips up front and a bunch of other plants and flowers below the front windows. But these plants don’t stand out primarily because we have come to expect to see the same plants and flowers house after house. Putting succulent plants in a container and putting two containers of the same style on either side of the front walk could serve as a welcoming decoration to your guests. Container gardening on the deck or the patio also adds a burst of color to an otherwise dreary garden space. Succulent plants lend instant color and texture, and it provides a focal point in the garden that ties the architecture of the house to the garden. In other words, it balances the overall look of the whole property.

2. Flexible Depending on Weather Conditions

Depending on weather conditions, you may need to transfer your succulent plants from outdoors to indoors, or vice versa. This is extremely hard to do, of course, if the plants have taken root in the actual garden soil. You would need to prepare well ahead of time and dig the plants’ roots to transfer them to specific containers. Do you really want to go through all that trouble every time the weather pushes you to put the plants inside? If they are in containers, you could easily put them carefully in a basket and transfer them to a safer place.

3. Provides Accents to the Garden

A single large container with an over-the-top succulent plant could serve as an accent to your garden. This could be the first thing that your guests will notice when they arrive at your property. Simply buy a container that’s big enough to embrace all the plants and flowers you want to combine. The possibilities are endless, of course, as you can combine succulents with ordinary houseplants. A guideline to follow is the “thriller, spiller, and filler” formula. The thriller is the focal point of the arrangement while the spiller will crawl over the edge of the containers. Finally, the filler will fill in the “gaps” in the arrangement.

Add to cart